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Coral tassels lariat

Coral and brass tassel earrings from my grandmother formed the inspiration for this five-foot-long, double-stranded lariat. Citrine, labradorite, garnet, carnelian, tourmaline, hessianite, aventurine, yellow jade, and freshwater pearls.

coral tassels lariat

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Amber and unicorn lariat

Murano glass, labradorite, wood, abalone, and sterling beads strung together in a five-foot -long lariat; a large amber teardrop and a unicorn pendant dangle from the ends. My father bought me the Murano glass beads when I was four, in Venice; the unicorn pendant was a gift when I was thirteen from my aunt and uncle.

amber, Murano beads, and unicorn pendant lariat

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Program cover, ConText XX

ConText is an annual speculative fiction convention that has a heavy writing focus. I loved it. I got to do the program covers two years in a row. This was the second year.

This year was a memorial cover, commemorating the death of one of ConText’s founders, Liz Gross, a biochemist and professor at Ohio State.

Context XIX program cover, 2006
See larger image.

For those interested in that kind of thing, here’s the symbolism applied in the picture, after discussion with one of Dr. Gross’s friends and fellow ConText supporters.

  • I used three test tubes in a rack to both indicate science, and three areas of her life suggested by her friend: science, science fiction, and Christianity.
  • White lilies emerge from one tube (digitally adapted from one of my own photos). Death and Christianity.
  • Elements and proteins emerge from another. The protein is plastocyanin, and all the elements & molecules listed are involved in cytochrome f. Investigating Dr. Gross online I found her particular areas of research involved plastocyanin and cytochrome f, so I hope she would appreciate this.
  • Science-fiction imagery and books spill out from the third test tube. One of the books reads ELeGy; her initials were ELG.
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Program cover, ConText XIX

ConText is an annual speculative fiction convention that has a heavy writing focus. I loved it. I got to do the program covers two years in a row. This was the first year.

The names on the books are authors associated with the convention.

Context XIX program cover, 2006
See larger image.

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Pink and peridot

A garden on your wrist. Pink tourmaline, peridot, and Austrian (Swarovski) crystal on laced strands of multi-toned green glass; sterling lobsterclaw clasp.

tasseled lariat
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Tasseled miniature lariat

Miniature tasseled lariat and earrings; a delicate 30 inches of Swarovski crystal and glass seed beeds with sterling chains.

tasseled lariat
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Sensitive plant necklace

An unusually responsive creature, the aquatic sensitive plant thrives in both sun and shadow. Here, Neptunia aquatica inspires pale citrine and carnelian blooms on subtly iridescent grey-green labradorite leaves. Like the living plant, each leaf responds to touch, swinging freely around its stem, sensitive to your moves like no other necklace. Scroll down to see a close-up and the complete necklace.

citrine, carnelian, labradorite sensitive plant necklace

sensitive plant necklace close-up

complete sensitive plant necklace
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Vine-laden trellis necklace

Heavy blooms fall between jade leaves from a trellised vine. Tourmaline, jade, iolite, blue aventurine, labradorite, and even a touch of amethyst; sterling silver.

jade and tourmaline trellis necklace
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Forget-me-not earrings

Freedom of movement adds to the wild beauty of true forget-me-nots, as each bud, leaf, and bloom swings freely on the main stem, creating ever-new, living art. Iolite, labradorite, glass seed beads, and tourmaline on shepherd’s crook earrings.

forget-me-not earrings
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Forget-me-not choker

True forget-me-nots, or Myosotis palustris, bloom on this delicate, unforgettable choker. Peridot, iolite, tourmaline, freshwater pearl, and labradorite petals and leaves swing on four strands of laced glass beads. A lobsterclaw clasp and chain allow a perfect fit for almost any neck.

forget-me-not choker

forget-me-not choker back lace detail

forget-me-not choker front detail
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Amethyst grape earrings

These stones were being discarded by Shannon Diego, the jewelry company I worked for; I couldn’t bear to let that happen, so I got permission to use them for test pieces. The concept was rejected, but I was allowed to keep this pair.

amethyst, labradorite, and garnet earrings
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Sea twilight lariat

Ocean waves at twilight. A five-foot strand of iolite, apatite, labradorite, and Czech crystal with blue aventurine teardrops.

twilight ocean lariat

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Sea spray choker

Inspired by sea spray, this delicate choker is made of iridescent Indian glass, quartz, and freshwater pearl with a lobsterclaw clasp. Adjustable chain allows this choker to be worn high on the neck, or lower, at the base.

sea froth choker
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Hematite bracelet

Hematite and freshwater pearl bracelet with copper glass seed beads; sterling finishings with pewter spacers.

hematite strands bracelet
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Geometric archetypes

Several basic geometric shapes form the underlying design for not only art, but much of nature. This was an attempt to reflect that concept, using color as well as form. The Promethean fire blossoming from the hollow of the throat outward was a continuation of a theme first seen in the deconstructive evolution necklace. It’s not an accident that this location is the heart of the throat chakra, which holds creative inspiration and communication.

geometric shapes y-neck necklace
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Fossil and labradorite necklace

From the Inthegno catalog: “From the depths of time as well as the sea. Orthroceras, a cousin to the modern-day squid and octopus, has waited patiently for over half a billion years—for you. Subtly iridescent labradorite with freshwater pearls and sterling accents provides the perfect setting; fossil shapes vary. Lobsterclaw clasp; choker length.”

Fossil Orthroceras and labradorite necklace

An alternate fossil shape:

Fossil Orthroceras and labradorite necklace alternate
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Deconstructive evolution necklace

Early in 2003 I experienced a sudden surge of creativity, which felt as though all my ideas were bursting out from the shells they had hidden inside, all at the same time. This choker was a celebration of that—a flowering of energy breaking free from a very conservative structure piece.

Garnet, freshwater pearl, carnelian, hessianite, sterling, and a touch of gold on a leather cord. This was a rejected design from my lead beading designer days, purchased for me from Shannon Diego by my fiancé.

deconstructive evolution necklace: garnets, carnelian